George web 300The LAFP Member of the Month is a forum to recognize and highlight our members. We hope you enjoy learning about fellow members both on a personal and professional level.  LAFP is proud to recognize Jody George, MD as our February 2018 Member of the Month. 
 
Dr. Jody George is a family medicine doctor in Westlake, Louisiana and is affiliated with multiple hospitals in the area, including Cornerstone Hospital of Southwest Louisiana and West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital. He received his medical degree from American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine and completed his residency at LSU - Lake Charles in 2007.  Dr. George serves on the LAFP Board of Directors as well as the LAFP Education Committee.  He has been in practice for 11 years and speaks multiple languages, including French. 
  1. How do you spend your free time? My free time is mostly spent with my family biking, kayaking or taking in a movie or watching football and soccer. One of my favorite pastimes though is sitting on my front porch rocking chair listening to old records.
     
  2. If you weren’t a physician, what would you be doing with your career right now? My career has always been healthcare. I started out as a trauma nurse at LSU Shreveport and would probably still be there had I not made the decision to go to medical school. It was by far one of the most exciting jobs I have ever had.
     
  3. It is important for me to be a member of AAFP and LAFP because? Both organizations represent my personal medical ethics and personal values as well as projecting a true picture of the importance and value of Family Medicine to our country. I have had the privilege over the years of representing our state at the national level serving on committees. This has enabled me to see the hard work that the state and national organizations put in to develop policies to promote and protect the interests of Family Medicine, keeping the patient first above all.
     
  4. What advice would you offer to medical students selecting their specialty? To commit to the specialty that interests them most and the specialty that they can really see themselves in. I’ve always said that the best teachers are those that really have a passion for their subject. The same is true for physicians.
     
  5. Why did you choose family medicine, what’s your favorite aspect of it, and were you inspired by anyone? I chose Family Medicine because it is one of the few specialties of medicine that allowed me to really get to know my patients. I like the continual interaction with my patients. Probably the best part of Family Medicine for me is being able to be part of a patient’s every stage of life, watching them grow and giving support when it is time for them to say goodbye.
     
  6. What is something the “real world” has taught you about being a family physician that medical school didn’t teach you? Medical school never taught us how dependent people would be on us as physicians not only to care for their physical health but their emotional and mental health, requiring much, much more than just your knowledge of medicine. No schooling can prepare you for the real life struggles that your patients are dealing with day in and day out that can compound with their health problems.
     
  7. What is the best experience you have had throughout your career? My best experience in my medical career was my medical mission trip to Africa. I was able to go and be able to freely practice medicine without the thoughts of requirements and regulations. The people were in such need and showed so much gratitude that it reminded me what a sacred profession medicine is and what a true and unique gift I have to give to others.
     
  8. What is the biggest opportunity or challenge you see in the specialty in the next five years? In the next five years, I believe Family Medicine will become the leaders of healthcare and quality. I believe Family Medicine will be able to demonstrate its value to the healthcare community and prove its station as the cornerstone of medicine.
     
  9. Tell me something fun (unrelated to medicine) about yourself. Celebrating the holidays is one of my favorite ways to have fun. I always do rounds in costume on Halloween and love the opportunity to sport one of my kilts on St. Patrick’s Day.
     
  10. How do you balance the demands of career, leadership, family and your own well-being? How to balance the demands of career, leadership, and your own well being as a physician is a question that is as old as time, and I am not sure there is a perfect answer. There will always be a time when something or someone has to be sacrificed and unfortunately, in our profession, it can never be the patient. I can say that having a core group of colleagues and a call group that work well together to support and look after your patients when you have obligations that take precedence makes all the difference. A physician also has to make the most of his or her time outside of work, making time to take care of personal health and family. It also helps to have a family who understands that the demands of medicine are different from most other professions.
     
LAFP’s Member of the Month program highlights Louisiana family physicians in LAFP Weekly Family Medicine Update and on the LAFP website. We feature a biography and a Q&A with a different LAFP member each month and his or her unique approach to family medicine. If you know an outstanding family physician colleague who you think should be featured as a Member of the Month or if you’d like to tell your own story, nominate yourself or your colleague by contacting by contacting Ragan LeBlanc via email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
 

1.  My free time is mostly spent with my family biking, kayaking or taking in a movie or watching football and soccer.  One of my favorite pastimes though is sitting on my front porch rocking chair listening to old records.

2.  My career has always been healthcare.  I started out as a trauma nurse at LSU Shreveport and would probably still be there had I not made the decision to go to medical school.  It was by far one of the most exciting jobs I have ever had.

3.  Both organizations represent my personal medical ethics and personal values as well as projecting a true picture of the importance and value of Family Medicine to our country.  I have had the privilege over the years of representing our state at the national level serving on committees.  This has enabled me to see the hard work that the state and national organizations put in to develop policies to promote and protect the interests of Family Medicine, keeping the patient first above all.

4.  To commit to the specialty that interests them most and the specialty that they can really see themselves in.  I’ve always said that the best teachers are those that really have a passion for their subject.  The same is true for physicians.

5.  I chose Family Medicine because it is one of the few specialties of medicine that allowed me to really get to know my patients.  I like the continual interaction with my patients.  Probably the best part of Family Medicine for me is being able to be part of a patient’s every stage of life, watching them grow and giving support when it is time for them to say goodbye.

6.  Medical school never taught us how dependent people would be on us as physicians not only to care for their physical health but their emotional and mental health, requiring much, much more than just your knowledge of medicine.  No schooling can prepare you for the real life struggles that your patients are dealing with day in and day out that can compound with their health problems.

7.  My best experience in my medical career was my medical mission trip to Africa.   I was able to go and be able to freely practice medicine without the thoughts of requirements and regulations.  The people were in such need and showed so much gratitude that it reminded me what a sacred profession medicine is and what a true and unique gift I have to give to others.

8.  In the next five years, I believe Family Medicine will become the leaders of healthcare and quality.  I believe Family Medicine will be able to demonstrate its value to the healthcare community and prove its station as the cornerstone of medicine.

9.  Celebrating the holidays is one of my favorite ways to have fun.  I always do rounds in costume on Halloween and love the opportunity to sport one of my kilts on St. Patrick’s Day.

10.  How to balance the demands of career, leadership, and your own well being as a physician is a question that is as old as time, and I am not sure there is a perfect answer. There will always be a time when something or someone has to be sacrificed and unfortunately, in our profession, it can never be the patient.  I can say that having a core group of colleagues and a call group that work well together to support and look after your patients when you have obligations that take precedence makes all the difference.  A physician also has to make the most of his or her time outside of work, making time to take care of personal health and family.  It also helps to have a family who understands that the demands of medicine are different from most other professions.

 

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